The Food Diaries: Futo Buta.

The Food Diaries: Futo Buta.

In order to completely submerge myself in all things Soccer Shots, I spent my first week in Charlotte, North Carolina, learning and learning and learning alongside my team. My brain was in overdrive for hours each day, simply trying to absorb all of the information that was being tossed around the table. Fortunately, when our long days were over, we decompressed over some of the most delicious food I’ve eaten in a long time. Who took the cake? Futo Buta, a self-proclaimed “hip Japanese noodle house with a patio.” (I should also note that each time Futo Buta was said throughout the week, I genuinely thought they were saying Food-ha Buddha. I was wrong. Clearly.)

We were seated outside on the patio, and I was sweating through my shirt, chugging luke-warm water and using the menu as a fan. It was hot. Conversation was happening all around me, but the only thing I could focus on was how disgustingly sweaty I had to look. Great first impression, Abby. When the waitress came to our table, she rather quickly recommended the Rice Crispy Squares as an appetizer. I hardly heard her description of the delicacy, as I was pretty busy trying to regulate my body temperature. But we took her word for it, and added a side of fried brussel sprouts to our order as well. As she walked away, Tim, my new boss, said, “What a saleswoman! She recommended the most expensive thing on the menu, and we took the bait!” He had a point, and we all began to wonder how good it really would be.

Photos from Futo Buta   Fried brussels sprouts Pork belly bun Miso ramen  Tuna and rice cakes Hamachi Crudo Chef/owner Michael ?????? Photographed in Charlotte, NC on June 18th 2015 Photos by Peter Taylor

When the Rice Crispy Squares were placed in front of us, I was immediately intrigued. Deep-fried sticky rice provided the base for a DIY sushi-esque snack. I spooned out a bit of spicy tuna on top of my square, dipped it into the wasabi soy sauce, and gave it a whirl. As it turns out, our waitress was right – this was the most delicious appetizer. (Not to mention, I’ve always been a fan of food I have to work for. Like fondue!)

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Then, it was time for the main event. I asked the two Futo Buta regulars on my team for their suggestions, and quickly decided on the Chizu ramen, a dish served with copious amounts of pecorino cheese (one of my favorite cheeses in the world), whipped egg, shiso pesto, yuzu and black garlic. As I stirred my dish together, the cheese began to melt, and I scooped up each bite ever-so-gracefully and slurped the noodles off of my chopsticks. If I ever return to Futo Buta, I will never get anything else. It was wonderfully delicious, and deliciously salty. It was at that point that my sweatiness didn’t matter anymore. This dish took priority. Yum.

The Philadelphia Food Diaries: Cheu Noodle Bar.

The Philadelphia Food Diaries: Cheu Noodle Bar.

Do you ever have the kind of day where focusing on the task at hand seems nearly impossible? The kind of day when you’re sitting at your desk, headphones in, really trying to focus, but then a really good jam comes on and you start humming and shoulder dancing, and then all of a sudden you remember — shoot, I’m still at work. Or the kind of day when you ask your coworkers (in rotation because it’s less obvious that way) if they’d like to go grab a cup of coffee. Not because I needed any more coffee, but because I needed some fresh air, some movement, some of anything that would get me away from my desk. I was unmotivated, uninspired. Plain and simple.

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So my boss, picking up on my coffee-every-hour-on-the-hour kind of antics, asked if I wanted to go out for lunch with one of our vendors that was coming in town from New York. YES. Yes was my answer. (She also made me promise that I would actually do some work when we returned. Fine.) She chose Cheu Noodle Bar, a small Asian Fusion joint in Washington Square West that opens at noon each day. We stepped through the front door at approximately 12:07PM, and Cheu was already packed and the wait was 20 minutes. (Pro: More time out of the office, coddling my ADD. Con: I’m generally impatient, and I was also very hungry.)

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When we were finally seated at the bar, we agreed on two different appetizers: broccoli, served with Vietnamese sausage, peanuts and soy, and General Tso’s brussel sprouts, cooked with kimchi, rice pearls and tofu. As Jenee (my boss) placed the order, some gut-wrenching desire for the sweet potato rangoons kicked in. So I Psst‘d her. She rolled her eyes at me, and added them to our order. And thank god she did because they were crispy and wonderful and the perfect combination of sweet and salty and I honestly wish I could have eaten 173 more of them. The broccoli and brussels were also incredible, and even though we had just started to nibble on our appetizers, I began to realize how Cheu Noodle Bar had made its way onto the list.

Our seats at the bar overlooked the kitchen, and the chefs had no qualms about making casual conversation with us as they chopped, swirled, sizzled, diced, fired and grilled our food. Right in front of us! But my favorite part was something that Cheu has received a lot of heat for. It’s not authentic. It’s Asian fusion. It’s not authentic Asian; it’s whatever the heck they want it to be. With an Asian flare. And I respect that.

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Admittedly, I had already fallen in love with the place. And then the cook placed my bowl of fried chicken tan tan in front of me. Stop. A bowl of the most perfect ramen noodles, buried under broth, collard greens, a sweet tea egg, a big ol’ piece of fried chicken and cornbread furikake. I did what every over-confident, noodle-loving foodie would do, and I clumsily attacked this sensational dish with some chopsticks. I comically failed, but it didn’t even matter. Every bite was better than the last.

Cheu, I could cheu on your noodles all day. (Sorry, had to. Buh-dum-dum-psh.)